Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University

Hopkins Population Center

The Hopkins Population Center (HPC) was established in 1971 with a mandate to stimulate and facilitate interdisciplinary population research throughout the Johns Hopkins University.  From its inception, the vision underlying the HPC has been the highest quality research, resulting from interactions among population researchers from diverse disciplinary backgrounds, aided by state-of-the-art research infrastructure. One of the main goals of the HPC is to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across Hopkins schools and campuses.  It has offices on both the Medical campus (where Public Health, Medicine, and Nursing are based) and the Homewood Campus (where Arts and Sciences is based).

The HPC is using developmental infrastructure funds in several ways:  providing seed grants, supporting working groups, and supporting research and policy workshops and mini-conferences.  Its goal is to encourage interdisciplinary research and to support the development of new investigators.

Some of the Center's active pilot projects include:

Reducing Disability via a Bundled Bio-Behavioral-Environmental Approach (CAPABLE)
Longevity of Couples: Life Span Correlations Among Partners
Understanding Family Instability in the Lives of Poor Youth
A Simple Model of Migration in China
Saliva DNA Methylation
Integration of North Korean Refugees in South Korea
Migration Along the Transoceanic Highway
National Black Men's Health Pilot Study

The Hopkins Population Center is unique among population centers in that the great majority of its faculty associates are based in the Hopkins health institutions, namely the Bloomberg School of Public Health, the School of Medicine, and the School of Nursing. The HPC is a Center within the Bloomoberg School of Public Heath's Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health (PFRH). PFRH is grounded in a life course framework with domestic and international focal areas including: sexual and reproductive health, fetal origins of disease, maternal and perinatal health, child health, adolescent health, and women's health. Three additional focal areas currently being developed include: urban health, family health, and neurodevelopment, behavior and health. Skills emphasized in departmental training include: population sciences, biological markers and behavioral science, program evaluation, evidence-based advocacy and the translation of research for programs and policy.

Other Centers within the School of Public Health include the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, the Center for Adolescent Health, the Center on the Early Life Origins of DiseaseCAHMI - Child & Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, and the Urban Health Institute.

Areas of Specialization: 
Demography
Families, Fertility, and Children
Health and Social Inequalities
Population Health and Well-being

Pathways into Program

The Hopkins Population Center itself does not offer a M.A. or Ph.D. Program. However, students interested in working with the Center should consider applying to a graduate program at Johns Hopkins University. 

Demographic Methods Certificate Program
The certificate is designed to serve two audiences—masters or doctoral degree students at the Johns Hopkins University and junior and mid-level professionals—desiring to gain skills in applying demographic analytic methods to identify or forecast public health problems and evaluate the effectiveness of policies or interventions aimed at mitigating them. Demographic analytic methods are used to calculate denominators of health measures. They, along with epidemiology methods, are used to develop profiles of those at risk for health/disease conditions, evaluate healthcare interventions, forecast health resource needs, and inform healthcare policies and planning based on accurate projections of at-risk groups.

Students completing the certificate will gain competency in the comparative strengths and weaknesses of different methods of demographic analysis, appropriate application of demographic methods to the analysis of a range of population and health issues, and critical evaluation of the public health implications of results from applications of different demographic and population analysis methods.
To learn more, please visit the certificate overview.

Population and Health Certificate
The certificate is designed to serve two audiences—master’s or doctoral degree students at The Johns Hopkins University and junior and mid-level professionals—desiring to expand their knowledge of population dynamics and its linkages with public health issues and their ability to relate population-level concepts and measures of fertility, morbidity and mortality, and migration to epidemiologic risks. A population’s health is shaped by fertility, mortality and migration patterns, and population numbers themselves provide the denominators of basic measures of public health, such as life expectancy, cause-specific mortality rates and infection rates. 
To learn more, please visit the program overview

CONTACT INFORMATION
​Certificate Program Contact: Lauren Black
Phone: (410) 614-6676
Email: laurenblack@jhu.edu

How to Apply to a Certificate Program
Different certificate programs are open to different audiences. There are different application processes for students who are currently enrolled in degree programs at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and those who are applying as non-students (including students who are enrolled at other divisions of the Johns Hopkins University).

Degrees offered through the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health (PFRH)

Graduates in the Department are trained as research scientists, public health leaders and health professionals for careers related to a broad spectrum of population, family and reproductive health issues through a variety of degree programs:

Master of Science in Public Health
Master of Science in Public Health/Peace Corps Masters International
Master of Health Science
Doctor of Public Health
Doctor of Philosophy

Postdoctoral Fellowships
The Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health accepts postdoctoral fellows interested in population, family and reproductive health issues. Acceptance into the department as a postdoctoral fellow is based on an agreement between the trainee and a specified supervising faculty member. Applications for a postdoctoral position will not be reviewed without pre-approval from a Population, Family and Reproductive Health department faculty member. 

Individuals interested in applying for a postdoctoral position should contact Lauren Ferretti Black atlferrett@jhsph.edu or 410-614-6676.

Degree Types

Postdoctoral/Fellowships
Certificates/Minors
Robert W. Blum, MD, PhD, MPH, professor and chair of the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says that public health is different from other scientific ventures. To Blum, public health must go beyond understanding science to taking action that can improve health.
  • Sarah Szanton, PhD, CRNP an associate of the Hopkins Population Center (HPC) awarded early career support from the HPC has received an RO1 from the National Institute on Aging to study an innovative, bundled intervention to help keep at risk low income seniors at home and out of a nursing home.
  • The Three-City Study is an intensive study in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio to assess the well-being of low-income children and families in the post-welfare reform era. The study began in 1999 and comprises three interrelated components: longitudinal surveys, embedded developmental studies, and contextual, comparative ethnographic studies. Surveys were conducted in 1999, 2001, and 2005; and developmental studies were conducted in 1999 and 2001. The data from these components are publicly available.
  • Johns Hopkins Public Health explores the complex and compelling narrative of public health. Its stories explain the latest research breakthroughs as well as the persistent threats to human health such as malaria, AIDS, chronic diseases, injury, obesity, pandemic flu and other issues. The award-winning magazine of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health takes readers inside the most important issues of public health by covering the science, the scientists and the people who can most benefit by advances in health.

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